Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab
Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab
Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab
Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab
Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab
Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab
Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab

Heirloom Peppers variety seed slab

Regular price R155.00 Sale

Bishop’s Crown Pepper  

This variety has many names: Joker’s Hat, Friar’s Hat, Orchid, Christmas Bell, Balloon, Pimenta Cambuci, Campane, Ubatuba Cambuci, Aji Flor, to name a few! Bishop’s Crown Pepper is named for its distinct three-sided shape resembling a Bishop’s Crown. Although this variety can be found in Barbados, it may be indigenous to South America. Today, it is also found in Europe, possibly brought there from Brazil by the Portuguese sometime in the 18th century.

The plants are quite large growing 3 to 4 ft tall and produce flying saucer like 1 ½” wide pods. The flesh of each pod is thin but crisp. They mature from green to red.

TASTE: This is a mild pepper with a sweet and fruity flavor. The body of the pods have some detectable heat, but the wings are sweet and mild.

Jamaican Yellow Mushroom Chile Pepper

Description/Taste


Jamaican Yellow Mushroom chile peppers are small peppers with a shape similar to that of a spinning top or a mushroom’s cap. The peppers grow prolifically on compact plants that only measure up to two feet tall. Jamaican Yellow Mushroom chile peppers are about 2 inches long and just over an inch long. The pepper matures from a dark green to a bright yellow and its thin skin has a wrinkled appearance. Jamaican Yellow Mushroom chile peppers have an aroma similar to that of a bell pepper, with a fruity citrusy flavor and lasting heat. The level of spiciness for the Jamaican Yellow Mushroom chile pepper is similar to that of a habanero. The Jamaican Hot pepper is given a ranking of 350,000 Scoville Heat units, though some reports have it listed between 100,000 and 200,000 SHUs. 

Current Facts


Jamaican Yellow Mushroom peppers are also known as Yellow Squash or Jamaican Hot Yellow peppers. The spicy pepper is botanically classified as Capsicum chinense (pronounced chi-NEN-see), and earned its common name from its shape, which is similar to the cap of a button mushroom or a patty pan squash. The small yellow peppers are also given the scientific distinction of Capsicum annuum ‘longum group,’ which is the botanical group that includes chile and cayenne peppers. 

Nutritional Value


Jamaican Yellow Mushroom peppers contain high amounts of beta-carotene, which is responsible for the bright yellow colored fruit. All peppers contain high amounts of vitamin C (sometimes three times more than an orange), and vitamin A, as well as essential minerals like potassium and magnesium. The high levels of capsaicin in the fiery peppers also provide high levels of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. 

Applications


Jamaican Yellow Mushroom chile peppers can be used whole, with the seeds and ribs for the full spice, or remove them for less spice. Use gloves when handling the seeds and inner portions of the Jamaican Yellow Mushroom pepper. This will protect the hands from the oils which contain the source of the pepper’s heat, the compound capsaicin. Jamaican Yellow Mushroom peppers can be used in salsas or to make hot sauce. Blend destemmed peppers along with salt, then add white vinegar and let sit for up to a week. Jamaican Yellow Mushroom chile peppers are good for pickling as well as stuffing. The small spicy peppers will keep up to two weeks in the refrigerator when wrapped loosely in plastic. 

Ethnic/Cultural Info


Jamaican Yellow Mushroom peppers are widely used by people living in the Caribbean and Jamaica to make hot sauce and jerk seasoning. 

Geography/History


Jamaican Yellow Mushroom peppers were named for their country of origin. The tropical pepper is not very cold-hardy and grows best in a warm environment. All members of the Capsicum genus are native to South America and the Caribbean. Portuguese explorers brought seeds back with them to Europe and to other locations in their travels. Smaller peppers, like the bird’s eye peppers and tobasco varieties were dispersed by birds, who are immune to the effects of the capsaicin. There is some confusion as to the scientific nomenclature for the Jamaican Yellow Mushroom peppers. Species identification can be as varied as the species themselves; the small yellow peppers are sometimes listed with the scientific distinction of Capsicum annuum ‘longum group,’ which is the botanical group that includes chile and cayenne peppers. Jamaican Hot, or Yellow Mushroom peppers, are popular with home gardeners and ‘pepperheads’ and is not commercially cultivated. The peppers can be found in home gardens, and at small farms and farmer’s markets in subtropical and tropical areas.